example of specifications for a remodeling project by Otagawa-Anschel Design+Build

In some cases, specs are separate documents detailing product choices and installation practices. In other instances, the remodeler will put as much product info as will fit on the blueprints. This example is from Otogawa-Anschel Design+Build, in Minneapolis. 

Project specification documents have a big impact on a remodeler’s profit. Follow these guidelines to make sure they’re detailed, clear, and accurate. 

It's rare to find lighting guidelines backed up by documented field testing


The solution to handling stress often lies in better time management

A few easy-to-learn prompts combined with strong listening skills can help increase your close rate and avoid unhappy clients 

It can heat nearly five showers at once and could save homeowners thousands


The Forgent series is made out of a proprietary material—a sort of glass and pvc hybrid—that makes it stronger and more resilient 

In a tightly air-sealed house, a mechanical ventilation system ensures a healthy exchange of fresh air

This exterior stair was formed over the top of an existing concrete stair sandwiched between masonry walls


The home’s living room has the same footprint as pre-renovation, although it has been updated with new moldings and paint, as well as engineered hardwood flooring. The variegated wood plank and parquet floors are in the hallway, living and dining rooms. 

The New American Remodeled home’s interior shows off the latest products and technologies

computer lighting model

A computer lighting model converts input (such as ceiling and counter height, fixture and lamp type, surface color and reflectance, etc.) into both 2D output showing projected fc levels at every point on a 2x2 grid (above right), and a 3D model of the room showing the effects of the lighting plan (above). Current light levels at the island (right) are more than three times the 15 fc readings taken before the kitchen remodel.

Real-world footcandle readings shine a light on the importance of recessed fixture size, lamp type, and fixture location

In this bathroom for a master suite addition to a Tudor-style home, most of the daylight comes from two north-facing skylights.

Part of a master suite addition to a Tudor-style home in Denver, most of the daylight comes from two north-facing skylights. A monochromatic palette of light colors was chosen, with a contrasting dark stain used for “his” vanity to make it feel more masculine. Interior designer: Kristi Dinner, KD Design; general contractor: Coggeshall Construction

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