four remodelers thoughts on transparency in pricing in the home improvement industry

Four remodeling industry veterans’ thoughts on transparency

One way to combat the labor shortage is by using methods—such as modular construction—that require fewer workers and less time. Modular builds have picked up steam in the commercial market and many are predicting a slow, but steady, increase on the residential side as well. Installing a custom modular addition typically takes less than half the time as building an addition on site. 

The coming year will bring faster paced, more significant change across multiple areas of the remodeling market 

Grow your team by cloning your best salesperson

For companies dealing with the labor shortage, growth is only possible by adding efficiency

Solid growth happens after you take a hard look at your company’s strengths and weaknesses

Installers can leave a gap of a few inches to protect the drywall from moisture.

How to prevent moisture damage in residential and commercial bathrooms

To showcase its durability, this subfloor went through the iron man of building products 

Develop a proactive strategy to counter negative reviews that can result in serious damage to your company’s brand.

Here's how to produce a high-quality, marketing video using a drone. 

lenova deep apron front sink

A farmhouse sink you don’t have to build around

The first truly see-through electric fireplace heats separate rooms at different rates

When a balloon loses air or depressurizes, it gets smaller (and makes a funny sound), but houses don’t roll like that 

Shower curbs create several corners close to the floor of the shower, where they get wet from splashing water. Even a small leak can be disastrous because over time it creates an ever-increasing vulnerable area that takes on more and more water. 

Most shower leaks occur at curbs, corners and drains. Building redundancy into the system reduces the risk.

In this bathroom for a master suite addition to a Tudor-style home, most of the daylight comes from two north-facing skylights.

Part of a master suite addition to a Tudor-style home in Denver, most of the daylight comes from two north-facing skylights. A monochromatic palette of light colors was chosen, with a contrasting dark stain used for “his” vanity to make it feel more masculine. Interior designer: Kristi Dinner, KD Design; general contractor: Coggeshall Construction

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