A second life

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If you’re having trouble finding materials at your local supplier to suit a client’s taste, perhaps it’s time to give architectural salvage stores a try.

June 01, 2002


 

If you’re having trouble finding materials at your local supplier to suit a client’s taste, perhaps it’s time to give architectural salvage stores a try.

Historical renovators have relied on this resource for years to give their projects authenticity, but any remodeler can use vintage building materials, from plumbing fixtures to cabinets, to give jobs the perfect punch.

Fortunately, most major metropolitan areas have stores dedicated to architectural salvage. For example, Kansas City, Mo., has Meierhoff’s, a city-block showroom filled with antique stained glass. Santa Fe, N.M., has La Puerta, an antique and architectural store that specializes in doors. S.F. Victoriana in San Francisco carries items for all your turn-of-the-century needs.

Some salvage companies also offer online catalogs and ordering. In Chicago, Salvage One claims to be the “nation’s largest purveyor of architectural reclamation, singular antiques and curiosities.” Historic Houseparts in Rochester, N.Y., has an extensive selection of products online and accepts catalog orders as well.

Salvage numbers and Web sites to save:

© Meierhoff’s (816/421-4912)

© La Puerta (505/984-8164)

© S.F. Victoriana (415/648-0313)

© Salvage One (www.salvageone.com; 312/733-0098)

© Historic Houseparts (www.historichouseparts.com; 888/558-2329)

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