Tools & Equipment

ford trucks can be a good option for remodelers

Features like automatic emergency braking and wireless connectivity are becoming standard.

5 trends in commercial truck and van sales that help contractors make the most of company vehicles

"Not only was it more reliable and easier on our bodies, it also halved the time it takes to complete those types of jobs." 

One screw to solve the problem of anchoring into metal studs  

A zero-excavation foundation system that mimics the genius of tree roots

design pro being used by remodeler to do 3d rendering

Quick, customizable 3D home renderings for exterior replacement pros  

T-locks like these can help remodelers level floors easier

Any chance we get, we use the T-lock system.

screeneze

A no-spline, no-staples, no-stress porch screening system 

The result of an electrician being on the mend for six weeks 

An easier way to diagnose hard-to-find heat loss and water leaks behind the walls

The most heavy-duty coffee maker available 

"A small twist knob lets you easily open the machine and empty out the dust tray, and since there’s no water, there’s no slurry to dispose of at the end of the day."

robots in remodeling are coming close to true skilled labor

Say "hello" to the first non-human drywaller 

Products from Sherwin Williams, D-Cut, Woodhaven, Feeney, Raimondi, HIDFast, and Makita

pro remodeler's top 100 products

Professional Remodeler’s annual roundup of the top 100 products as chosen by you, our readers

A platform to streamline and simplify texting your leads

hadrian x fastbrick robot used for construction, and potentially, remodeling

The Hadrian X is loaded through its tail end, by a human. The machine uses half-meter precision blocks, the equivalent of 15 regular house bricks, and so the human needs a forklift to get the job done. That’s basically the only job a human has working with the Hadrian X, apart from helping to place lintels. It’s conceivable both could eventually be automated. 

After it’s loaded, the Hadrian X takes over. The blocks move along its conveyor belt being cut, ground, and ultimately fed up the machine’s boom, which is fitted with a robotic arm and a multi-axis stabilization system—the latter being particularly important for working in changing environments. The blocks are then placed (relatively rapidly) using CAD designs and lasers—one on the boom and one on the site—going course by course, laying adhesive and using gravity to set the blocks in, until both the interior and exterior walls are fully erected, complete with router channels for electric and plumbing. 

The trades come in day three, while the robot starts another job somewhere else.  

Robots in construction are no longer a thing of the future, but robots in remodeling are. Here’s what that future could look like.

3M's extreme post it are great for construction jobsites

Designed for the construction industry, 3M’s new post-its stick to lumber, brick, cement and steel

A single device to bring water monitoring into the smart home technology mix

It can heat nearly five showers at once and could save homeowners thousands

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