Ripples in the Pond

A couple of months ago, we bragged a bit about the terrific effort on the part of our local Remodelors Council to introduce high schoolers to remodelers, showing them the variety of career opportunities available in this industry

May 31, 2000
Rod Sutton, Editor-in-Chief

 

A couple of months ago, we bragged a bit about the terrific effort on the part of our local Remodelors Council to introduce high schoolers to remodelers, showing them the variety of career opportunities available in this industry. About two dozen students were affected by that initiative.

We’ve long touted - since this magazine’s inception in 1997 - the benefits of remodelers working with students to introduce them to the business and encourage them to pursue it. It’s appropriate, then, that we announce in June - graduation month - more success stories.

Professional Remodeler’s first Pinnacle Award winner, Bill Medina, CGR, has worked with children for many years. Most recently, he’s hooked up with his local high school to offer opportunities for students to investigate the remodeling business. Medina’s availability to his community and willingness to share with high school kids earned him the Pinnacle honor.

You hold the other success story in your hands. A portion of the price of each full-page ad in this issue is being donated to help students in the building trades. That money, combined with similar donations from our companion publication Professional Builder, will be split 50-50 and used to set up two funds: the Team Build Fund through SkillsUSA-VICA, and the Philip Polivchak Transition Fund for graduates of NAHB Home Builders Institute’s Job Corps Program.

These two programs will put money directly into the hands of building trades students who need financial help. The Team Build Fund will enable students to attend the Team Build program, a national competition sponsored by SkillsUSA-VICA. The Philip Polivchak Fund will assist graduates in moving from the education experience to the workforce.

Our publisher, Dean Horowitz, explains the mission behind these programs. "We want to attack the labor issue with a broad, all-encompassing reach. One program works with vocational students in high schools, the other works with ‘at-risk youth.’ By getting involved universally, we believe we can pull in more community involvement and set a real career path in place for individuals who are willing to commit to a profession in the building trades."

HBI has trained and placed more than 200,000 in the construction trades over the years and has expanded NAHB’s Student Chapters program, which currently has 2,600 members in 125 chapters. More than 40,000 students will participate in the SkillsUSA Leadership Event this year. Take a look at those numbers for a moment. Think about the Remodelors Council reaching out to 25 kids, and then think about Bill Medina and his three high schoolers. A pebble or a stone; the ripples travel a long way.

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