Is Recruiting 90 Percent Marketing?

Four pillars of one company's proven hiring process

January 04, 2018

Since its founding in 1983, Reborn Cabinets, based in Anaheim, Calif., has grown to become an industry standout with nearly $31 million in revenue in 2016 and as many as 400 employees on any given day. The company delivers on its sales promises with great installers, field engineers, designers, and project leaders. Reborn also relies on a call center to help process leads. Needless to say, company president Vince Nardo is constantly looking for good employees. “We have three full-time people recruiting for us,” he says. “It’s a learned trade. Not everybody can do it.”

More than just reviewing résumés, scheduling appointments, and making phone calls, Nardo views the recruiting team as marketing pros. “Recruiting is a marketing function,” he says. “I look at it as outbound marketing, like billboards, radio, or newspaper advertising.”

The best way to hire people, Nardo believes, is to first impress them with the company environment. “The remodeling industry thinks recruiting is just about hiring. It’s not,” he says. “You are selling somebody on your company.”

Nardo explains that to attract the best employees, remodeling firms should emphasize the following areas throughout the hiring process:

Core values of the company: What does the company stand for and how do these ideals translate into employee satisfaction? It’s also helpful to showcase any company cause or vision for improving the world.

Future advancement opportunities: Emphasize that there is a clear path for promotion within the company. If there is a continuing education program, make sure the candidate is aware of it.

Compensation package: Remember that compensation can be more than money. For example, does the company offer flex days or opportunities for remote work? Is there a bonus structure or other spiffs that could help sway the candidate in your direction?

Interview process: This can be the most important element of recruiting. Create presentations that are interesting and informative, and present the work environment as warm and welcoming.

“The whole idea should be to give each potential employee a world-class experience,” Nardo says. “We even provide our candidates with a marked parking spot in the front of the building to show they are welcomed.”

About the Author


About the Author


Vincent Aviani is an award-winning writer living in Los Angeles and Montericco, Guatemala. He has more than 15 years’ experience writing about the people, places, and events that shape the real estate and building industries.

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