PRIME Perspectives: The many way to define success

Our PRIME advisory panel includes some of the remodeling industry’s top professionals. This month we asked, “How do you measure business success?”

December 15, 2014

Team Success

I measure my personal success by the success of my team. If they are succeeding personally and professionally, then I have reached my goal. But I don’t think I can ever say, “I have achieved success.” Every time I think I’m getting close to it, the world changes and the bar has been raised higher. So I start all over again, knowing that I’m that much better than before.

Jay Cipriani, President; Cipriani Remodeling Solutions, Woodbury, NJ

 

Building a Legacy Brand

I think most business people measure success with profit and the creation of wealth. But I did not set some magic number years ago, and I have most of the possessions I want. Because my company carries my father’s name, I measure my success on having built the brand. I think most would agree we have accomplished that. I took on my father’s values, including the perspective that a business should give back to the community. Most would say we have done that. I believe my best measure of success will be if I can transition the company to the next generation and preserve the 200 jobs we now employ and the culture we have built.

Tom Kelly; Neil Kelly Inc., Portland, OR

 

Giving Back

Business brings financial awards, but I am always striving to be a better person. I view business success in the ability of our company to reward our team with some of the best benefits and recognition in the industry. Business success also means being able to serve our  clients, and giving back to the community in ways that make it a better place to live.

Gary Marrokal, President; Marrokal Design & Remodel, San Diego, CA

 

Focus on Others

Success is a process, not  a destination, and I have trouble thinking about what it means to “arrive” at success. I joke that in the self-help section of a bookstore there should be only one book, with just one page that says, “It’s not about you.” As the years have gone by, my success measurements, both personally and professionally, are more focused on trying to impact others in a way that brings growth and joy, be it family, coworkers, or clients.

Bill Baldwin, TITLE; HartmanBaldwin Design/Build, Claremont, CA

 

Mentoring Younger Remodelers

I have been very blessed. Life is too short to measure our achievements in financial success. As I get older, giving back becomes much more important to me than the financial measures of success. I am also focusing more of my time on helping others (mainly younger members of the industry) achieve their personal success. 

Chris Edelen, President; Edelen Marketing Associates, San Antonio, TX 

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