PR February 2007

August 16, 2010

Features

Last year was a good one for remodelers, as Professional Remodeler's Business Results Survey found the highest average volume and profits in the survey's history. The average company in our exclusive industry survey has now been in business for 19 years, has 20 employees and has an annual installed volume of $4.

The owners of this 1930s Washington, D.C., house loved their home, their neighborhood and their yard. But they also needed more room for their growing household as they transitioned from a couple living alone to a family with two young children. They didn't want to move, so adding on became the only option.

Most of us learned the trades from watching others rather than formally being taught. Most of us learned business from old wives tales — stuff we heard at lunch, over a beer or during tirades from a previous boss. Well, guess what: most of what you heard about business is wrong, as you might agree after looking over the following myths.

Owners of this french country home were not pleased with their less-than-thoughtful existing sunroom addition, which amounted to what SawHorse project manager John Patterson calls a "giant, cedar octagon plant room." It did not blend with the home's stucco exterior, and because its only connection to the home was through a set of double doors, it didn't carry natural light throug...

The clients, both organic cooks, wanted a kitchen for their Washington home that nourished their desire to create meals using homegrown ingredients. From a functional point of view, this required more space. Aesthetically, they wanted a look that represented their nature-based perspectives. An avid cook himself, Jonas Carnemark, president of Carnemark Systems & Design, knew that...

There's only so much a job interview can tell you about a prospective hire. "People can tell me whatever they think I want to hear when I'm interviewing them," says David Heaney, president of Rockland Architecture and Rockland Builders of Newport, Del. That's why Heaney uses personality profiles for anyone who interviews for a job with his high-end remodeling firm.

Who does a remodeler turn to when he runs into problems that keep the company from growing? It could be a CPA, attorney or therapist, or it could be a professional peer group that offers many resources and valuable expertise from fellow remodelers. Tom: Today's topic is the value of peer groups.

Your strategic marketing plan begins with becoming very clear about what you are selling and what your unique selling proposition (USP) is. To have a successful business, you will need to put a marketing plan in place to generate quality leads to achieve your budgeted sales revenue, gross profit margin, the salary you desire and net profit.

If you're bringing in more than $2 million a year and your business is in good shape financially, stop what you're doing and pay attention to what I'm about to say. Now is the time to consider ramping up your business and grabbing more of your local market share. The time is ripe for profitable, established, professional remodeling firms like yours to eliminate — once and for all — ...

Plumbing can be a major hassle for professional remodelers. Pipes take up space and limit where walls can go and which walls can come down. It also can take days for a plumber to reroute conventional piping. Some of these systems leave little room for plumbing upgrades or make it difficult for homeowners to reach shutoff valves.

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