flexiblefullpage - default
interstitial1 - interstitial
Currently Reading

Building Team Communication

Advertisement
billboard -
Management

Building Team Communication

To achieve excellence within our companies' cultures, leaders must work hard at keeping healthy relationships. Our communication skills must be a strength, not a weakness. It takes time, energy and effort, but it pays big returns by producing better results and deeply enriched relationships. It's a double win.


By Doug Dwyer, Contributing Editor June 30, 2005
This article first appeared in the PR July 2005 issue of Pro Remodeler.

To achieve excellence within our companies' cultures, leaders must work hard at keeping healthy relationships. Our communication skills must be a strength, not a weakness. It takes time, energy and effort, but it pays big returns by producing better results and deeply enriched relationships. It's a double win.

Think of it in the context of health: Either take time out to keep living healthy or take time out for sickness. As leaders we must be proactive in building a positive growth culture, being more observant and having challenging conversations when needed.

As psychologist and author Robert Anthony wrote, "You get treated in life the way you train people to treat you."

If we don't like the way someone treats us, we must take personal responsibility to communicate that to the person.

Don't do it in a demonstrative way, but in a way he or she can understand your feelings. Simply say: "I need to discuss something with you that is bothering me, but I am concerned it might offend you. May I share with you what I think? The condition and health of our relationship is important enough to me to bring it up."

In effect, if you don't communicate how you think or feel, then you are communicating (training others) that everything is OK just the way it is. It's easy for you to say that the other person should notice you are upset or feeling taken for granted or whatever the issue may be.

Yes, some people can be unaware of what is going on with others around them. This could be because of their focus on other things, lack of people skills, personality conflicts, selfishness or pride — any number of reasons. Whether the reason is good or bad, they are not mind readers and need to know what is really going on with you. This will provide them with the information and motivation to respond differently in the future.

You may find out it was just a simple misunderstanding. You may find out you were wrong or that an individual is unwilling to change, but at least you addressed the issue and have a clear understanding. It's much easier said than done, but it must be done. Otherwise, the relationship will slowly decay or be destroyed.

A warning: You can take communication too far by being brutally honest to the point of being ugly, saying everything that comes to mind and completely crushing people around you. That is not the goal. Rather, the desired outcome is to communicate effectively and to improve the relationship.

If that is not the perspective from which you are working, then you should cool off first. You shouldn't do something you'll regret by unnecessarily hurting someone or ending a relationship prematurely.

I don't want to candy-coat things either. Sometimes it is absolutely necessary to be blunt. Depending on communication styles, it may be the only way to be heard. It may hurt at first, but when the person has a chance to digest things, typically the response will be a positive one. Better yet, he or she may say, "Wow! I never knew that and I'm glad you told me. I don't want you to feel that way."

Lastly, we need to think about to whom we are speaking and choose an approach that is appropriate for that person, whether an employee, peer or boss. Speak up when needed; preferably meet one-on-one; respect the chain of command; and do it with a caring spirit.

In difficult situations, call a business friend or consultant for advice, but don't let the problem continue to slide. It can then build up and become an explosive situation. As a business consultant once said to me, "It is easier to kill the monster while it is little."R


Author Information
Doug Dwyer is president and chief stewarding officer of DreamMaker Bath & Kitchen by Worldwide, one of the nation's largest remodeling franchises. He can be reached at doug.dwyer@dwyergroup.com.


Related Stories

5 Things To Do About "It"

Although the changing economy and resulting consumer behaviors may feel out of your control, there are still a few impactful things you can do

Does Encouragement Really Matter?

Home improvement industry leader Brian Gottlieb shares the importance of encouragement for any business

Tips to Get Started on Your Exit Strategy

It’s never too early to begin planning the next stage of your life. Industry advisor Mark Richardson offers some tips to get started

Are You a Farmer or a Hunter?

Industry advisor Mark Richardson says that over the last year, there’s been a major shift in the remodeling business from a farming mentality to a hunting skill set

The Argument for a Four Day Remodeling Work Week

The four-day work week has a global spotlight—could it work in remodeling?

How We Nurture Trade Partner Relationships

Here's what the director of production of a $36 million company does to strengthen trade partner relationships

Sustainability and Strengthening Company Values

Allen Construction CFO Lindsay Helmick talks company values, new initiatives to strengthen them, and the company's focus on sustainability.

A Letter to Your Clients: 10 Ways to be a World-Class Client

Mark Richardson flips the script, offering insights into what makes a good client and ways remodelers can help

5 Tips for Successful Performance Reviews

If you want to peek into a successful business, look inside the minds of its people

Why Change Orders Are Good

Use these few simple steps to alter how your company addresses change orders

Advertisement
boombox1 -
Advertisement
native1 -

More in Category

Business

5 Things To Do About "It"

Although the changing economy and resulting consumer behaviors may feel out of your control, there are still a few impactful things you can do




Business

Are You a Farmer or a Hunter?

Industry advisor Mark Richardson says that over the last year, there’s been a major shift in the remodeling business from a farming mentality to a hunting skill set

Advertisement
native2 -
Advertisement
halfpage1 -