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Director of Content

Erika Taylor is the director of content for Professional Remodeler. Contact her at etaylor@sgcmail.com or 972.803.4014.

New Year’s Resolutions

Without a clear vision of success, it’s tough to stick to any resolutions

December 11, 2019
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I am one of those people who always make New Year’s resolutions. Yes, my promises tend to be overly ambitious, and yes, they often vanish by February. Yet I find it intensely satisfying to annually commit myself to growth. I place enormous value in self-improvement and welcome the new year as a time to embrace positive change.

Every December, around 35% of Americans commit to some sort of goal for the upcoming year. Unfortunately, only one in five of them actually succeed. There are a number of reasons for this.

First, many goals tend to be too vague, and thus not measurable or actionable. These include things like, “Enjoy life more,” “Spend less money,” or “Eat healthier.” Without a clear vision of success, it’s tough to stick to any of those promises.

Another common reason for failure is a trap I frequently face: resolutions that are too ambitious and go against our basic nature. For me, these include goals like, “Do not procrastinate on important deadlines,” or “Plan ahead more.” Better to recast it as “Every Monday, I will write down goals for the week,” and “Four times per year, I will organize tasks for the next quarter.” 

With that in mind, I gave serious thought to my 2020 resolutions. I generally make a personal commitment and a professional one, and this year, I wanted to take the professional resolution in a new direction. Rather than aim for behavioral change, I decided to focus on a clear accomplishment that would help me better serve our remodeling audience. I wanted something that supports the industry while also expanding my own knowledge base. 

Every December, around 35% of Americans commit to some sort of goal for the upcoming year. Unfortunately, only one in five of them actually succeed.

It then occurred to me that I frequently tout the importance of industry groups and the fantastic education they offer, yet I hold no certifications. That will change in 2020: My New Year’s resolution is to become a Certified Aging in Place Specialist. 

I selected CAPS for three reasons. First, there is no requirement for the designee to be a remodeler. The courses are designed for people in the construction field as well as in government, health, advocacy, and academia. In other words, anyone who is invested in better understanding the needs of America’s fastest growing demographic. 

Second, the aging of the baby boomers along with changes in attitudes around people with disabilities have created a shift in mindset. The day is coming when the availability of universal design will be taken for granted, much the way energy efficiency has now become the norm. 

And finally, Pro Remodeler is the proud sponsor of NAHB’s Homes for Life Awards, and I am honored to present the winners at the International Builders’ Show. It only seems right for me to more deeply support the expertise and values the award celebrates. 

So there it is: simple, clear, actionable, and measurable. If you’ve got a resolution for yourself or your business, drop me a note and let me know what you have planned for 2020. Happy New Year!

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