Better than Ever

Remodeling homes and redesigning magazines might seem to be two completely dissimilar endeavors. In reality, however, there are a lot of similarities between renovating an existing home and revamping the content and design of a publication such as this. The first step in either instance is to define the needs and desires of the people who will be using the finished product.

March 31, 2005

Michael Morris
Michael Morris
Editor in Chief
630/288-8057
michael_morris@reedbusiness.com

Remodeling homes and redesigning magazines might seem to be two completely dissimilar endeavors. In reality, however, there are a lot of similarities between renovating an existing home and revamping the content and design of a publication such as this.

The first step in either instance is to define the needs and desires of the people who will be using the finished product. In the case of a remodel, that usually includes the homeowner and other family members who live in the home and will use it as they go about their lives after you've left the jobsite and received the final payment. How will they be using the space? Do they have any special needs that should be addressed during the project? How can you make new components or additions relate to the overall structure most effectively?

These questions, and many more, must be thoroughly considered if the result is going to meet the expectations of your customers.

In redesigning Professional Remodeler, we went through this same painstaking process of evaluation to identify what you want most and either add it or improve upon it. Through online reader surveys, a strong editorial advisory board of top remodelers, and daily conversations with our readers, the team behind Professional Remodeler planned an improved content model and new design for "remodeling" the magazine.

Time and time again, we heard about the importance of personal connections in the remodeling business, so our cover redesign is a reflection of that emphasis on individuals who are leaders in the industry.

Major additions

For starters, we've added to our stable of expert contributing editors who will appear on a regular basis. Doug Dwyer, president and chief stewarding officer of DreamMaker Bath & Kitchen by Worldwide, debuts this issue with his column, Leadership. As the leader of one of the nation's largest remodeling franchises, Doug has a thoughtful perspective that will provide intelligence and insight on how to improve your company's profit potential from the top down.

Another new columnist, business consultant Dave Taraboletti, will lend his technical expertise to Tech Know-How, where he'll offer common-sense ideas and practical solutions for integrating the latest technology into the field and office to streamline your processes, save time and add dollars to your bottom line.

Each month we'll focus on a different topic in 5-Minute Manager, which makes its debut with a look at customer satisfaction and how to make your customers happy, increasing referrals and therefore sales.

An ongoing process

As often happens in the remodeling business, you'll finish one project at a customer's home and before you know it, they'll hire you to take on a new one.

The same is true of our ongoing commitment to improving our content to meet your needs. We're interested in hearing what you think of the new Professional Remodeler, and we welcome and encourage your comments and suggestions as to what we can do to further improve it.

630/288-8057, michael.morris@reedbusiness.com

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