Editorial/News

StudioDin / stock.adobe.com

Five tips for overcoming common pitfalls when working with allowances

This homeowner incorporated exercse into her room, with the exposed concrete sealed to prevent off-gasing.

How to create a dedicated healthy space in the home

flextime

Strategies that enable employees to enjoy a better work-life balance are becoming more popular. But can a home improvement company adopt them?

A single-source digital solution to the in-home sales process

American Standard Beale MeasureFill Faucet on pro remodeler

A kitchen faucet that dispenses precise amounts of water at the touch of a dial

framing with thick zips

This cold-climate wall system allows for smooth old-to-new transitions and incorporates a flush-framed deck ledger detail

chalk lines made by quick release knot and professional remodeler doing remodeling

String lines are a simple way to keep things straight. But if the knot isn’t easy to tie and untie, the string keeps getting shorter.

under-stair storage designed and built into the structure

Five examples for creating storage when you’re short on space (or just trying to save it) 

ride along with pro remodeler sales manager

A step-by-step breakdown for sales managers from a leading remodeler

home improvement professional installing a window

When it comes to selling windows, something may be better than nothing

design for pro remodeler's model remodel home

The finished design, with more than twice the square footage of the original, truly takes advantage of the home’s location.

This California remodel, with its unique layout, will maximize the perks (and views) of coastal living

 

hadrian x fastbrick robot used for construction, and potentially, remodeling

The Hadrian X is loaded through its tail end, by a human. The machine uses half-meter precision blocks, the equivalent of 15 regular house bricks, and so the human needs a forklift to get the job done. That’s basically the only job a human has working with the Hadrian X, apart from helping to place lintels. It’s conceivable both could eventually be automated. 

After it’s loaded, the Hadrian X takes over. The blocks move along its conveyor belt being cut, ground, and ultimately fed up the machine’s boom, which is fitted with a robotic arm and a multi-axis stabilization system—the latter being particularly important for working in changing environments. The blocks are then placed (relatively rapidly) using CAD designs and lasers—one on the boom and one on the site—going course by course, laying adhesive and using gravity to set the blocks in, until both the interior and exterior walls are fully erected, complete with router channels for electric and plumbing. 

The trades come in day three, while the robot starts another job somewhere else.  

Robots in construction are no longer a thing of the future, but robots in remodeling are. Here’s what that future could look like.

The kind of outlets and switches designers get excited about

woodton-cement-siding-finish

A higher-priced finish that clients don't mind paying for, because it's worth it

The risk-reward nature of fixed-price contracts may not be the best fit for today’s design-build market 

Panic ensues when something goes wrong with the garage door

noncompete agreement

As more employers make use of noncompetes, courts find that these restrictive agreements are going beyond the bounds of original intent

Over the past few months, Amazon made a bold move in the home services space

It's going to affect a lot of your materials 

Overlay Init