Business

Growth in volume measures growth in transactions, but no one goes into business just to maximize transactions 

Remodeling for an architect-homeowner.

Jud Motsenbocker, CGR, has been teaching remodelers how to understand profit-and-loss statements for years.

The difference between a successful project and one that causes a lot of headaches often has more to do with what the customer expects.

The pen is a powerful weapon. Harnessed correctly, it can do powerful good.

Letter to editor on draw schedules and in-house help.

A Scottsdale, Ariz., remodeler offers a money-back guarantee to his clients.

Rosie Romero offers tip for pulling off the Impossible Promise.

The Institution of Management and Information's website provides information from 40 business management newsletters.

If interest in spirituality and wellness continues, you might soon be fielding calls from homeowners seeking holistic remodeling.

Employee incentives

Outline details the ins and outs of one commercial remodel's cash problems.

Salon owners praise the remodeler who created their day spa.

One commercial remodel overcomes problems to create a beautiful salon.

Gehman still uses some subcontractors.

Editor's column advising remodelers to look at other industries that are 'stealing' away laborers as competition.

One remodeler outlines good computer security tactics for remodelers to follow.

A site preparation checklist can help manage customer expectations.

An outline of stereotypically problematic clients and tips for managing them.

Using in-house labor can have more benefits than using subcontractors, according to Dennis Gehman.

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