Customer Comments

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Michael and Sherry Waldorf were worn out before their remodeling even started, having bounced from architect to architect trying to obtain a complete and buildable plan. When Matt Plaskoff Construction took over, both the project and the Waldorfs were ...

October 05, 1999

Michael and Sherry Waldorf were worn out before their remodeling even started, having bounced from architect to architect trying to obtain a complete and buildable plan. When Matt Plaskoff Construction took over, both the project and the Waldorfs were reinvigorated.

 

 

  • The clients gleaned practical design guidance. Architect Karen Zindler-Shuler had good ideas and was easy to communicate with, says Michael Waldorf. She quickly produced buildable plans and solved a potential space problem by specifying a compact hydro heating system that fit in attic space over the new bathroom. Cabinetmaker Tom Jones Woodworks fleshed out the designs for built-ins.
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  • Production flowed smoothly. Considering the number of changes, the project went smoothly. Thanks go to the two project managers who ran the job at different points, and the well-practiced team of subs who work regularly on Plaskoff projects. "They know how to work with each other," says Waldorf.
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  • The contractor took responsibility for solving problems. "Matt listens carefully," says Waldorf. He is also quick to respond when an issue is raised. "He makes you feel confident that problems will be solved fairly. He never makes you feel you’ll be left holding the bag or unsatisfied."
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  • The contractor set a standard of integrity in business. Plaskoff was fair all the way around, says Waldorf. "After the job he sat down with us [to obtain feedback on the company’s performance]. His goal is to improve constantly. He’s a credit to his business and profession. If more people had his kind of integrity and business ethic, the business world would be a far better place."

    Lessons Learned

    Adopt a languishing Project

    • 1. Expect frayed nerves. Before you became involved, the clients weathered problems. Now they are closer to the breaking point.
    • 2. Provide TLC. The clients chose you to fix their troubled project. Make sure you are there to help guide the job, answer questions, and ease concerns.
    • 3. Take charge of problem solving. One of the most appreciated services you can provide is to identify problems and take the lead in solving them.
    • 4. Accommodate late decisions and change orders in your system. Integrate changes into the production schedule to keep the job moving; fold change-order charges into progress billings to keep cash flow positive.

    Also see:

    Project Spotlight: Remodeling Rescue

    Cash Flow Analysis

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